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Faculty

Meghan Conley

Director of Community Partnerships
Department of Sociology
Ph.D. University of Tennessee

The University of Tennessee
912A McClung Tower
Knoxville, TN 37996-0490

Phone: 865-974-7032
E-Mail: mconley2@utk.edu

Interest Areas

Crimmigration; Latinx Migration; Participatory Action Research; Social Movements

I am the Director of Community Partnerships in the Department of Sociology at the University of Tennessee. In this capacity, I organize collaborations between our department and organizations in the Knoxville area. My goal is to help community groups use sociological knowledge and research methods to address critical issues and to facilitate community-based research opportunities that serve the department’s social justice mission.

My research examines the political, economic, and ideological systems that sustain structural inequalities for Latinx immigrants, and how immigrants resist these structures of power. I am currently working on a book, under contract with Temple University Press, about immigrant rights organizing in the New South.

Books

  • Conley, Meghan. Immigrant Rights in the Nuevo South: Enforcement and Resistance at the Borderlands of Illegality. Under contract with Temple University Press.
  • Bohon, Stephanie and Meghan Conley. 2015. Immigration and Population.  London: Polity. *Awarded Choice Outstanding Academic Title, American Library Association

Articles

  • Conley, Meghan. 2015. “In Times of Uncertainty: The Great Recession, Immigration Enforcement, and Latino Immigrants in Alabama.” Pp. 147-162 in M. Aysa Lastra and R. Cachon Rodriguez, Immigrant Vulnerability and Resilience: Comparative Perspectives on Latin American Immigrants During the Great Recession.  Springer.
  • Conley, Meghan. 2015. “The Hypothetical Social Movement Campaign as Teaching Tool.” The Southern Sociologist 46(4): 10 – 14.
  • Bohon, Stephanie A., Meghan Conley, and Michelle Brown. 2014. “Unequal Protection under the Law: Encoding Racial Disparities for Hispanics in the Case of Smith v. Georgia." American Behavioral Scientist 58: 1910-1926.
  • Conley, Meghan. 2013. “I Now Pronounce You PoliMigra: Narrative Resistance to Police-ICE Interoperability.” Societies Without Borders 8(3): 373-383.
  • Conley, Meghan. 2012. “Nativism is Big Business.” Z Magazine 25(33).
  • Kim, Joongbaeck and Meghan Conley. 2011. “Neighborhood Disorder and the Sense of Personal Control: Which Factors Moderate the Association?” Journal of Community Psychology 39(8): 894-907.
  • Conley, Meghan and Stephanie A. Bohon. 2010. “The Spectrum’s Other End: Solidarity and Distrust in a New Latino Destination.” Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies 3(4): 13-30.

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